14. The Chemical Brothers – ‘Exit Planet Dust’

Posted: March 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Album Review, Breakbeat, Dance Rock, House, Techno | Tags: | No Comments »

The Chemical Brothers - 'Exit Planet Dust'

The Chemical Brothers * Exit Planet Dust * 1995 * Astralwerks

Exit Planet Dust was the beginning of an unlikely journey. The Chemical Brothers‘ earliest fans originally mistook the English duo, who looked more like they were from Milwaukee than hip London, for the Los Angeles-based producers The Dust Brothers. Ed Simmons and Tom Rowlands had originally used “The Dust Brothers” moniker as a tribute to their LA-based heroes, who had produced the seminal Beastie Boys album, Paul’s Boutique. They switched their name when the real deal threatened to sue.

But Simmons and Rowlands had a much bigger mark to make. Their early singles exploded on dance floors across the globe. ‘Song to the Siren’ was their first breakthrough, a pound cake of Run DMC-inspired beats and heady acid tweaks. But it was ‘Chemical Beats’ that really tore the roof off. It was a reach-for-the sky blast of scratching acid squiggles, pinpoint cow bells and stadium crowd dynamics, tossing everyone over the moon. What was evident from the start was their knack for concocting rocking beats with technological precision. The meticulous placement of a softer bass pulse as a backbeat on ‘Chemical Beats’ is a prime example — the resulting call-and-response between the main bass drop and the subtler note creates a deeper sense of space and intimacy. It’s a dimensional nudge that tucks you right into the pocket of the groove.

Tapping into this raw energy, Exit Planet Dust put everyone in the driver’s seat. Its starter ‘Leave Home’ zooms, slides and howls, hooking listeners with its motor funk. ‘In Dust We Trust’ continues the rock guitar grinds, chunky beats adding meat to the psychedelic romp. ‘Song to the Siren’ and ‘Chemical Beats’ make devastating cameos while ‘Three Little Birdies Down Beats’ wields an ax of acid glory. But the Chemicals also had a sweet side. The instrumental ‘Chico’s Groove’ and ‘One Too Many Mornings’ use haunting chords and uplifting rhythms to cast spells of catharsis. The defiant ‘Life Is Sweet’ features vocals by Tim Burgess of The Charlatans, the first of many rock collaborations that would include the likes of Noel GallagherWayne Coyne and Richard Ashcroft. And ‘Alive Alone’ reveals a softer songwriting bent, featuring vocalist Beth Orton, who would appear again on subsequent albums.

The British music press derisively labeled the Chemical’s breakbeat techno as ‘Big Beat,’ easily the stupidest name possible for their groundbreaking sound. But in America, few ravers cared about the politics of the London music scene, and immediately heard kindred spirits in the Chemicals. A Pacific wave was already moving in California, where producers like UberzoneBassbin Twins and The Crystal Method were filling in the blanks.

Given the Chemicals’ impressive career, that enthusiasm was right on the money. There would be plenty of fireworks down the road. But Dust was that first rush of hitting the accelerator, a turbo-charged beginning to a long and strange trip of sonic alchemy.

Tracks:
1. Leave Home
2. In Dust We Trust
3. Song to the Siren
4. Three Little Birdies Down Beats
5. Fuck Up Beats
6. Chemical Beats
7. Chico’s Groove
8. One Two Many Mornings
9. Life Is Sweet
10. Playground to a Wedgeless Firm
11. Alive Alone



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