Underworld doing the live thing

Posted: November 9th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient, Ambient Techno, Audio-Visual, Breakbeat, Events, House, Techno, Web Culture | 1 Comment »

Underworld live light installation


Underworld launches members' downloads section

Posted: October 29th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient, Ambient Techno, Audio-Visual, Breakbeat, Dance Rock, Events, House, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

Underworld circle graphic

You can now start a member’s account on Underworldlive.com to receive special treats and music downloads. According to recent interviews, they have a ton of unreleased stuff up their sleeves, a lot of it banging techno. Apparently they will be dispersing it through their site in the near future. Enjoy!


Underworld's Rick Smith at Abbey Road

Posted: October 29th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient, Ambient Techno, Audio-Visual, Breakbeat, Dance Rock, House, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

Underworld's Rick Smith at Abbey Road
Here’s a snapshot from ongoing Underworld pics at Underworldlive.com. This one is of Rick Smith during the recording of Oblivion with Bells at Abbey Road Studios. Most people don’t know it, but Rick is the production genius behind Underworld’s stunning compositions.


Underworld live CDs

Posted: October 17th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient Techno, Breakbeat, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

In case you’re looking for your live Underworld fix, LiveHereNow.com is supplying limited CDs of several Underworld performances in England. Anyone who has been to their live shows knows these guys fly. Wish I had the funds to pick them all up myself.


Underworld's "Oblivion with Bells," play-by-play analysis

Posted: October 16th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Album Review, Ambient, Ambient Techno, Breakbeat, Dance Rock, House, Techno, Web Culture | 1 Comment »

Underworld on the Beach

Photo of Karl Hyde and Rick Smith by Perou.

So I’ve been listening to Oblivion with Bells in more detail. A key session involved a start-to-finish odyssey with my Harman-Kardon sound system. I am happy to report that my esteem of the album has not sunk but skyrocketed. I actually think this is their best work yet, period. It’s like pouring pure sonic light into your ears … soma vibrations. Read the rest of this entry »


Eat Static – "De-Classified"

Posted: October 15th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Album Review, Ambient, Ambient Techno, Breakbeat, Drum 'n' Bass, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

Eat Static "De-Classified" album cover

After several years, Eat Static have returned with a proper album of tough beats, innovative sounds and yes, alien weirdness. De-Classified will excite longtime fans, sounding closest to their classic Impact LP. From the start, we’re prowling in familiar territory — b-movie sci-fi samples swimming around plasmic funk, cosmic flights, tripped-out synth washes and buzzing riff attacks. Read the rest of this entry »


New Underworld Album Almost Here

Posted: October 13th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient Techno, Audio-Visual, Breakbeat, House, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

Underworld’s Oblivion With Bells hits the shelves on Tuesday. The buzz so far has been good, the latest coming from Scott Otto at Entertainment Today, who writes, “This is music for now, for today, for all of us who need hope to get through the days and nights of uncertainty that is 2007. And also for those of us who need beauty in our dance music.” Read the rest of this entry »


Ostentatious, 2002 Interview with Future Sound of London

Posted: October 12th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Ambient, Ambient Techno, Dance Rock, Web Culture | No Comments »

It’s taken me a while, but here’s an unedited, at times maddening, but brilliant and funny interview with Garry “Gaz” Cobain of Future Sound of London. It’s from 2002 when I talked with him about the group’s wild departure into rock-electronic psychedelia. In it, he expounds about his spiritual awakenings, Brad Pitt, the bullshit of corporate labels, fashion, music cycles and his journey of self-healing. You’ll also learn about Radiohead and organic carrot juice.

Reading it again now, I’m reminded how FSOL have always been about ten years ahead of the curve. We’ve been living through a repressed, angry and cocaine-fueled culture the last few years, paranoid and at war. Cobain’s magpie mind seems even more prophetic today as the plight of the planet grows in our consciousness.

On the music front, we now have new-rave, electronica rock and tecktonik. Is a new wave of wildly psychedelic music next? Could Jimi Hendrix and drum machines be right around the corner? Well, maybe not exactly, but I still think FSOL are onto something.

Read it now.


Radiohead's "In Rainbows" hits the world

Posted: October 10th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Album Review, Ambient, Ambient Techno, Dance Rock, Web Culture | 2 Comments »

Radiohead's "In Rainbows"

Radiohead’s doorstep to a brave new era of artist self-empowerment. Click and join the party.

Listen to Radiohead’s In Rainbows:
15 Step
Bodysnatchers
Nude
Weird Fishes/Arpeggi
All I Need
Faust Arp
Reckoner
House of Cards
Jigsaw Falling Into Place
Videotape

Radiohead‘s long-awaited new album In Rainbows comes to the world like a hushed blessing. Word of it has hummed loudly across the media, but once it flows onto millions of hard-drives, it’s spinning rhythms and quiet power will feel more like a private prayer.

I’m going to go out on a limb and say this is a massive milestone for popular music for some very important reasons. One, the album is an instant classic. It’s evident from the first listen and gets better and better. Of course time will be the ultimate judge, but I will wager my reputation on it. Second, this album has the potential to reach more listeners across the economic ladder. You can donate whatever you want or grab it for free. I paid five pounds for my download and I would hope others who can afford it will contribute the same or more. Third, this is a major statement by the world’s leading rock band about the power of the Web to free art from corporations and to unlock the door to a bright new age of music.

All these things together impress the ears with greater emotion upon listening to In Rainbows. I have always dug Radiohead, but this is the first album I can say I truly love. Here they have finally harmonized all of their influences into a sonic poem that surpasses the moment. The glitchy rhythms of “15 Step” give way to the electronic buzz of “All I Need,” while the loving noise of “Bodysnatchers” deepens the heart-aching beauty of “Reckoner” and “House of Cards.”

The end result is extraordinary, making the manner of the album’s delivery even more profound. This is what we’ve needed for too long, an open way forward for cutting-edge music.

To take this risk, to eschew major label security, to empower fans with choice, to allow for modulated devotion at the transfer, this is the wave of the future.

Radiohead are riding it, and it’s thrilling. Join them.


LCD Soundsystem's journey from punk to techno

Posted: September 27th, 2007 | Author: | Filed under: Dance Rock, House, Techno, Web Culture | No Comments »

James Murphy DJs

LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy rides the wheels of steel. Photo by DFA Records.

London’s Fabric nightclub and imprint is putting out a DJ mix album by LCD Soundsystem‘s James Murphy and Pat Mahoney next month. A U.S. domestic release will follow in November. Perusing Fabric’s recent and very in-depth interview with the two, I found the following nuggets especially insightful:

James: My DFA partner Tim Goldsworthy, he came over with David Holmes to work on a record and I was like this is new, this is weird, nobody plays this sort of thing. It was a very different way of making music and then I went out and did ecstasy when David was DJing and heard Liquid Liquid for the first time.
Pat: James helped me build a rehearsal studio for Les Savy Sav, who ostensibly speaking, he broke up, and this was the genesis of LCD and also me leaving Les Savy Sav.
James: So I played bass and he played drums and it was just like Liquid Liquid, and we were trying to wrap our heads around making people boogie.
Pat: That was like ’96, with dubious results, totally foreign to us in a lot of ways because indie kids were not dancing.
James: No, they weren’t looking to boogie. But it was fun. Read the rest of this entry »